Due Diligence of Enterprise Culture

If I like to buy another company (with mainly knowledge workers) I would be interested to know their productivity factor of their enterprise culture. I would pay more for a company with an enterprise culture which leads to a productivity of 200% (related to average companies) compared to a company with an enterprise culture which leads to a productivity of 50% (related to average companies).

This productivity potential due to the enterprise culture cannot be solely derived from commercial data, as the commercial situation of the company depends also on many other factors (e.g. their position in the market).

The question is:

  • How can you measure the economic value of an Enterprise culture?
  • How much would you pay more for a company depending on this metric?
  • Is the productivity factor of an enterprise culture (at least in theory) a proper metric of the culture. Nevertheless, how do measure the productivity factor?
  • People CMM might lead you to a set of indicators for an enterprise culture, but does not really measure the business impact of these indicators. Metrics like function points are solely focussing of resources input and function output of the current (or past) work, but do not evaluate the productivity potential of the employees if the market and therefore usually their kind of work changes. Is a combination of both the right answer?
  • Could  a knowledge networking and collaboration index be developed which is the right answer to my question?
  • Trust is one of the most important productivity drivers. How can you measure the trust in a company?

Does trust pay off?

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About heisss

http://www.michael.heisss.at
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